district beat

wherein I keep you on top of music coming to and out of DC

It’s a killer show when you’re in the front row and you still can’t get a good shot because the lighting’s down and Sara Taylor is jumping around like a banshee. 
Technophobia played a gorgeous set to open (and that opinion is not colored at all by my knowledge of the band’s frontman; it really was moving). COMING, with whom I was not familiar, shredded on some hardcore punk numbers and really impressed. And Youth Code. Well. Youth Code. Let’s just say the drummer from COMING jumped on stage and screamed along with their encore. 
I spoke with Sara before the show, who came across as incredibly chill and excited to play. We talked about Saddle Creek Records and Cursive’s The Ugly Organ, which certainly took me back. Then she screamed her soundcheck. It was on. 
Any show with rough, hard music feeds on the crowd. When the room feels it, the performers feel it. And let me tell you, the room felt it. The Black Cat staff said it was one of the best lineups there in recent memory, but it was also a perfect pairing of raw energy from the bands and an audience dying to release some rage. It was heavy, like a weight sinking to the pit of your stomach that then bubbles up and comes out as a shriek. It was brash. It was unforgiving, unrelenting, and carried us home. 

It’s a killer show when you’re in the front row and you still can’t get a good shot because the lighting’s down and Sara Taylor is jumping around like a banshee. 

Technophobia played a gorgeous set to open (and that opinion is not colored at all by my knowledge of the band’s frontman; it really was moving). COMING, with whom I was not familiar, shredded on some hardcore punk numbers and really impressed. And Youth Code. Well. Youth Code. Let’s just say the drummer from COMING jumped on stage and screamed along with their encore. 

I spoke with Sara before the show, who came across as incredibly chill and excited to play. We talked about Saddle Creek Records and Cursive’s The Ugly Organ, which certainly took me back. Then she screamed her soundcheck. It was on. 

Any show with rough, hard music feeds on the crowd. When the room feels it, the performers feel it. And let me tell you, the room felt it. The Black Cat staff said it was one of the best lineups there in recent memory, but it was also a perfect pairing of raw energy from the bands and an audience dying to release some rage. It was heavy, like a weight sinking to the pit of your stomach that then bubbles up and comes out as a shriek. It was brash. It was unforgiving, unrelenting, and carried us home.